Hunter and scientist: two wild boar reviews in Saskatchewan

While a hunter offers his services to hunt wild boars that plague Saskatchewan farmers, a researcher believes that hunting can help the population grow.

Tyler Smits has been hunting wild boars for years. The Saskatoon hunter has posted advertisements on the Internet and on social media that suggest hunting wild boars that are too invasive for farmers or residents of the province.

[Wild boars] are very, very difficult to hunt. They are very smart. [The know-how] comes with experience.

Tyler Smits, hunter

Tyler Smits has not been contacted yet. According to him, many farmers kill the wild boars themselves to eat them.

In Saskatchewan, no license is required to hunt wild boars, but a valid firearms license is required.

According to Ryan Brook, a researcher at the University of Saskatchewan, wild boars are not a huge problem for Saskatchewan right now, but there may be more wild boars than people in Saskatchewan. province in the future.

“The [population] increase is exponential,” says Brook, adding that the area in which wild boars live is growing rapidly.

According to him, these animals can damage crops and keep livestock away from their water sources and food. He also explains that they can be “disease reservoirs”.

“They do not graze […]. Deer and elk will come in and they will graze and feed on grass and vegetation, while wild boars pull out the soil […]. And they feed on everything. ”

They put their nose in this soil and they tear it like a tiller.

Ryan Brook, Researcher, University of Saskatchewan

Ryan Brook says he found wild boars with belly filled with canola or frogs, and they can pull the cattail from the roots or feed on the eggs of birds during this time of the year.

Hunting can contribute to the growth of wild boars

“We also see people in Saskatchewan, and all over Canada, who like to have wild boars because they can hunt them,” Ryan Brook adds.

According to him, if a hunter does not kill a whole group of wild boars, they will become more suspicious, will be pushed into new areas of habitat and will continue to breed freely, which will provide them with relative safety.

“My main goal is not necessarily to help solve the global boar problem, but to help a farmer and fill my freezer,” says Smits.

The hunter states that there were other ways to eliminate wild boars, including through explosives placed in a nesting area. In this way, a hunter can eliminate a whole group of wild boars. However, when killed in this way, wild boars can not be eaten, he laments.

Beth Harrell is a reporter for DailyL. After graduating from The University of Alberta,, Beth got an internship at CTV news affiliate WBC-TV and worked as a reporter and videographer. Beth has also worked as a reporter for Huff Post Canada. Beth mostly covers entertainment and community events for DailyL.

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